General Information

The Department of Economics & Management welcomes all incoming exchange students from our designated partner universities.

We are pleased to offer a comprehensive international course program. The program has a duration of 3 months and will be offered each October until December.

Within the program, our visiting students can choose from a variety of interesting and challenging classes. The lectures are read in English language and will be rewarded with up to 6 ECTS upon successful completion.

See below the current selection of classes and regarding information on requirements and examination modes.

For any questions or inquiries, please do not hesitate to contact the department’s delegate for international relations, Prof. Dr. Elisabeth Müller (contact details see below), or the international office.

Courses

Intercultural Leadership

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Hendrik Hüttermann

Workload: 180h; Contact hours: 24h; Self-study: 156h

Time: tbd

Recommended prerequisites:

Basic knowledge in the field of leadership and organizational behavior that is typically acquired in undergraduate management courses. 

Please note that this seminar is only suitable for master students.

Content:

Given the increased globalization of markets and internationalization of many organizations, working and taking over leadership positions in foreign cultures have become essential parts of most successful careers.

The aim of this seminar is to analyze the implications of cultural diversity for organizational leadership from theoretical and practical perspectives. In a first step, participants become familiar with basic principles and approaches of measuring cultural differences. After this, the implications of cultural differences for successful leadership in different regions of the world are discussed. Moreover, challenges and approaches for leading culturally diverse teams are analyzed.

The seminar topics are discussed based on up-to-date scientific findings as well as examples from organizational practice and case studies.

Learning objectives:

The seminar aims at the following qualification goals:

  • Sharpen awareness for the relevance of cultural differences for leadership and cooperation
  • Acquire basic knowledge on seminal approaches for measuring cultural differences
  • Enhance understanding of the implications of cultural differences for successful leadership in foreign cultures and cooperation in multicultural teams
  • Practice transfer of acquired knowledge

Proof of performance:

Presentation and term paper. The specific modalities for obtaining the grade certificate will be announced at the beginning of the seminar.

Bibliography:

  • House, R. J., Hanges, P. J., Javidan, M., Dorfman, P. W., & Gupta, V. (Eds.) (2004). Culture, leadership, and organizations: The GLOBE study of 62 societies. Sage.
  • Kraimer, M., Bolino, M., & Mead, B. (2016). Themes in expatriate and repatriate research over four decades: What do we know and what do we still need to learn? Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior, 3, 83–109.
  • Stahl, G. K., & Maznevski, M. L. (2021). Unraveling the effects of cultural diversity in teams: A retrospective of research on multicultural work groups and an agenda for future research. Journal of International Business Studies, 52(1), 4–22.

Economics and Law of the Information Society

Lecturer:

Prof. Dr. Karl Morasch, Prof. Dr. Stefan Koos 

Workload:

150 hours; Contact hours: 24h; Self-study: 126 hours

Recommended prerequisites:

Basic knowledge of economics and private law, as is usually acquired in a Bachelor's program with a business or economics major.

Content

The course deals with the economic and legal issues arising from the increasing importance of electronic marketplaces, markets for information goods (e.g. music, films or news) and social networks. The formation of social networks, particularities of information goods and markets with network effects as well as suitable corporate strategies for competition in such markets will be discussed. Subsequently, electronic marketplaces for consumers (e.g. ebay) and the use of e-commerce in trade between companies will be dealt with in the context of intermediation and auction theory. From a legal perspective, in addition to the intellectual property regulations relevant to information goods (copyright, software patents), the legal issues of electronic commerce under contract law and competition law as well as the particular legal problems of cross-border electronic commerce and domain law are dealt with. Further themes are the legal and economic implications of interactions on social networks (e.g. facebook) and the related problems of data protection and privacy policy.

Learning objectives

Students acquire knowledge of national and international legal norms for electronic commerce, intellectual property and social networks. From an economic perspective they gain an understanding of the concept and implications of information goods, the specifics of electronic marketplaces and the incentives to form social networks. By discussing both legal and economic aspects, students become aware of the complex interaction of the institutional framework and economic incentives.  

Proof of performance:

Written examination of 60 minutes or grade certification (“Notenschein”). If the proof of performance is provided in the form of a grade certification, this will be announced at the latest at the beginning of the course, together with the specific modalities for obtaining the grade certificate (which could for example comprise a combination of term paper and a class presentation).

Bibliography:

  • Goyal, S. (2007), Connections: An Introduction to the Economics and Networks, Princeton (NJ): Princeton University Press.

  • Shapiro, C., Varian H. R. (1999), Information Rules. A Strategic Guide to the NetworkEconomy, Boston (MA): Harvard Business School Press.

  • Shy, O., (2001), The Economics of Network Industries, Cambridge (UK): CambridgeUniversity Press.

  • Vulkan, N. (2003), The Economics of E-Commerce. A Strategic Guide to Understanding and Designing the Online Market Place, Princeton (NJ): Princeton University Press.

Business Analytics

Lecturer:

Prof. Dr. Claudius Steinhardt 

Workload:

180 hours; Contact hours: 36h; Self-study: 144 hours  

Content

  • Introduction to Business Analytics
  • Data Preprocessing & Exploratory Analytics
  • Methods of Classification
  • Clustering & Association Rules

Learning outcomes

  • Students will have a broad overview of the different aspects of the field and be theoretically competent in dealing with the challenges of business analytics 
  • Students will have basic theoretical knowledge of different particular methods of data mining for business analytics, being able to analyze their potential and their individual strengths/weaknesses depending on the given task 
  • Based on the theory, students will be enabled to systematically and adequately apply state-of-the-art software to solve business analytics tasks 

Proof of performance:

Written examination 

Bibliography

  • Larose, D., Larose, C.: "Discovering Knowledge in Data: An Introduction to Data Mining", Wiley (current edition).
  • Larose, D., Larose, C.: "Data Mining And Predictive Analytics", Wiley (current edition).
  • Shmueli, G., Bruce, P., Patel, N.: "Data Mining for Business Analytics: Concepts, Techniques, and Applications in XLMiner", Wiley (current edition). 

Applied Public Management

Lecturer:

Prof. Dr. Julia Thaler 

Workload:

180 hours; Contact hours: 24h; Self-study: 156 hours 

Recommended prerequisites:

The module requires basic knowledge of public management issues, as typically acquired in any bachelor's program in economics.

Content:

In this module, selected current challenges of public management are analyzed on the basis of practical case studies (e.g. Cases from Harvard Business School Publishing) or current practical projects and thus, theoretical knowledge is applied to concrete questions. Implications for management are derived.

Learning objectives:

After completing the module, students should be able to critically discuss the particularities of public management and transfer theoretical knowledge to concrete practical questions. They should be able to derive implications for coping with current challenges.

Proof of performance:

Written examination of 60 minutes or grade certification. If the proof of performance is provided in the form of a grade certification, this will be announced at the latest at the beginning of the module, together with the specific modalities for obtaining the grade certificate.

Bibliography:

  • Bovaird, T. & Loeffler, E. (2016), Public Management and Governance. London and New York: Routledge
  • Ferlie, E., Lynn, L., & Pollitt, C. (2007), The Oxford Handbook of Public Management. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
  • Current research articles from leading public management journals (Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Public Management Review, Public Administration Review) 

Economics of the European Union

Lecturers:

Prof. Dr. Karl Morasch, Prof. Dr. Axel Schaffer

Workload:

150 hours; Contact hours: 24h; Self-study: 126 hours

Recommended prerequisites:

Students should possess a basic understanding of microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts as provided in introductory courses in economics.

Content:

The course starts with an introduction to the history and the institutions of the European Union. After that we deal with microeconomic aspects of the European integration, especially considering the impact of the EU as a customs union and with the further integration to a common market. We then proceed to macroeconomic aspects, in particular the implications of the Euro as a joint currency. Based on this, we discuss the international financial crisis of 2008 and the following Euro crisis as well as other recent EU events as the unfolding of the Brexit.

Learning objectives:

Students obtain a sound understanding of the economic aspects of the European Union. Beyond that, the course provides information on the history and the institutions of the EU and knowledge about recent events like the Euro crisis or the Brexit in particular. By working together with students from different countries, participants also get to know the diverse viewpoints from people inside and outside the European Union.

Proof of performance:
Written examination of 60 minutes or grade certification (“Notenschein”). If the proof of performance is provided in the form of a grade certification, this will be announced at the latest at the beginning of the course, together with the specific modalities for obtaining the grade certificate (which could for example comprise a combination of a term paper and a class presentation).

Bibliography:

Baldwin, R., Wyplosz, C., The Economics of European Integration, 6th ed., London: McGraw-Hill, 2019.

Contact details

Office 36/2154 Office 36/2154

Legende

  • 1: Office 36/2154