General Information

The Department of Economics & Management welcomes all incoming exchange students from our designated partner universities.

We are pleased to offer a new international course program, starting from October 2020. The program has a duration of 3 months and will be offered each October until December.

Within the program, our visiting students can choose from a variety of interesting and challenging classes. The lectures are read in English language and will be rewarded with up to 6 ECTS upon successful completion.

See below the current selection of classes and regarding information on requirements and examination modes.

For any questions or inquiries, please do not hesitate to contact the department’s delegate for international relations, Prof. Dr. Claudius Steinhardt (contact details see below), or the international office.

Courses

Working and Managing in a Multi-Cultural Context

Lecturer:

Prof. Dr. Sonja Sackmann

Workload:

180 hours; Contact hours: 24h; Self-study: 156 hours 

Recommended prerequisites:

Knowledge in the areas of corporate management, personnel and organization or dealing with people in organizations is required.

Content

The Intercultural Management module sensitizes students to the cultural complexity in the context of organizations and teaches the basics of working in foreign cultures as well as cooperation in inter-, multinational and globally active companies. The focus is on interaction relationships between people from different cultural backgrounds in an organizational context as well as how they deal with multiple cultural identities. This course teaches theories, models and dimensions in order to recognize and understand cultural differences. On the basis of a simulation and case studies, the students experience and work out to what extent intercultural differences in the organizational context influence work life, cooperation, communication and leadership processes and what prerequisites are needed to deal constructively with cultural differences. 

Learning objectives:

The Intercultural Management module is an interest module of the specialization Development of Sustainable Organizations. It focuses on sensitizing students to cultural differences within the framework of international and global cooperation, taking cultural diversity into account. The students learn to understand central processes, dynamics and conflict potentials in inter- and multinational cooperation and to develop effective ways of dealing with foreign cultures and cultural diversity. This knowledge has a high practical relevance for working in the context of an increasingly global economic world. This module also teaches social skills in inter- and multinational cooperation. 

Proof of performance:

Written examination of 60 minutes or grade certification. If the proof of performance is provided in the form of a grade certification, this will be announced at the latest at the beginning of the event, together with the specific modalities for obtaining the grade certificate.

Bibliography:

  • Boyacigiller/Phillips/Kleinberg/Sackmann, Conceptualizing Culture. Elucidating the Streams of Research in International Cross-Cultural Management. In: Punnett/Shenkar (Hrsg.): Handbook for International Management Research. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2. Überarbeitete Aufl. 2004: 99-167.
  • Harris/Moran, Managing Cultural Differences, 6. Aufl., Elsevier, 2004.
  • Primecz/Romani/ Sackmann (Hrsg.) Cross-Cultural Management in Practice: Culture and Negotiated Meanings, Edward Elgar, 2011. 

Strategic Organizational Design

Lecturer:

Prof. Dr. Stephan Kaiser

Workload:

180 hours; Contact hours: 24h; Self-study: 156 hours 

Recommended prerequisites:

Knowledge in the areas of corporate management, human resources and organizations is required, as typically acquired in an economics bachelor's and master's program.

Content:

In the Strategic Organizational Design event, the interplay between strategy and organization will be examined from an organizational theory perspective. Starting from the debate on "structure follows strategy", fundamental problems of organizational design and their connection with strategy are analyzed. Building on this, students learn about important topics of strategic organizing: the importance of change and stability (dynamic abilities, ambiguity, path dependency), of organizational boundaries & structures (open organization, heterarchies, fluidity) as well as of the environment (inter-organizational networks, ecosystems, dynamics) for strategic organizational design. In addition to theoretical and conceptual input, the contents will be developed and deepened on the basis of case studies.

Learning Objectives

The module is offered to students of the specialization Development of Sustainable Organizations as a compulsory elective module or to all students as a field of interest. On the basis of theoretical concepts, students learn about central challenges for strategic organizational design and the associated management implications. The conceptual and analytical knowledge imparted in the module is of high practical relevance for work in organizations. Due to the strong interaction of the students, the module also imparts social and communication skills. 

Proof of performance:

Written exam or grade certificate, which can be acquired through assessed group work/seminar papers.

Bibliography:

  • Schreyögg, G., Geiger, D. (2016): Organisation: Grundlagen moderner Organisationsgestaltung, 6. Aufl., Wiesbaden: Springer Gabler
  • TBA

Information, Organization and Management

Lecturer:

Prof. Dr. Martin Hepp

Workload:

180 hours; Contact hours: 36h; Self-study: 144 hours

Recommended prerequisites:

Basic microeconomic and business management knowledge is required, as taught in basic economics courses in relevant bachelor programs. 

Content

The module deals with the connections between (1) the changed communication possibilities through the Internet and services based on it and (2) the change in the structure of economic activity. In particular, the influence on the division of labor and forms of coordination, the decision between in-house production or external procurement, the definition of company boundaries and the appropriate design of information systems are highlighted. In each case, the impacts between economic effects and Internet-based, automated processes are worked out together with the students. 

Learning objectives

By participating in this course, students will be able to understand the impact of internet-based communication on business processes, internal organization and market conditions on sales and procurement markets of companies and value chains, and to make corresponding operational decisions in a scientifically sound manner, in particular with regard to the design of contracts and communication relationships with customers and suppliers. 

Proof of performance:

Written examination of 60 minutes or grade certification. If the proof of performance is provided in the form of a grade certification, this will be announced at the latest at the beginning of the event, together with the specific modalities for obtaining the grade certificate.

Bibliography:

Textbooks:

  • Picot, A.; Reichwald, R.;Wigand, R.: Information, Organization and Management, Springer, 2008.
  • Shapiro, Carl; Varian, Hal R.: Information Rules: A strategic Guide to the Network Economy. Harvard Business School Press, Boston, MA, USA 1998. 

Further Reading:

  • Chesbrough, Henry; Spohrer, Jim: A research manifesto for services science. In: Communications of the ACM 49 (2006) 7, pp. 35-40. 
  • Coase, R. H.: The Nature of the Firm. In: R. H. Coase (Eds.) 33-55.
  • Cordella, Antonio: Does information technology always lead to lower transaction costs? In: S. Smithson; J. Gricar; M. Podlogar; S. Avgerinou (Eds.): Ninth European Conference on Information Systems. Bled, Slovenia, 2001, pp. 854-864. 
  • Malone, Thomas W. et al.: Electronic Markets and Electronic Hierarchies. In: Communications of the ACM 30 (1987) 6, pp. 484-497. 
  • Malone, Thomas W. et al.: The Logic of Electronic Markets. In: Harvard Business Review (1989) 3, pp. 3-8. 
  • Sampson, Geoffrey: The myth of diminishing firms. In: CACM 46 (2003) 11, pp. 25-28.
  • Succi, Giancarlo et al.: Network Externalities in Software Systems. In: Standard View 6(1999) 4, pp. 185-191. 
  • Taylor, Frederick Winslow: The Principles of Scientific Management. (Reprint 2006). Aufl., The Echo Library, Middlesex, UK 1911. 
  • Thome, Rainer; Hufgard, Andreas: Continuous System Engineering. Vogel Verlag, Würzburg 1996.
  • Williamson, Oliver E.: The Economics of Organization: The Transaction Cost Approach. In: The American Journal of Sociology 87 (1981) 3 (Nov. 1981), pp. 548-577. 
  • Wallis, John Joseph; North, Douglas C.: Measuring the Transaction Sector in the American Economy, 1870-1970. In: S. L. Engerman; R. E. Gallman (Eds.) 95-161. 

Economics and Law of the Information Society

Lecturer:

Prof. Dr. Karl Morasch, Prof. Dr. Stefan Koos 

Workload:

180 hours; Contact hours: 24h; Self-study: 156 hours 

Recommended prerequisites:

Legal and economic knowledge is required, as is usually acquired in a Bachelor's program in economics.

Content

The event deals with the economic and legal issues arising from the increasing importance of electronic marketplaces and markets for information goods (music, films, news, etc.). The particularities of such information goods and markets with network effects as well as suitable corporate strategies for competition in such markets will be discussed. Subsequently, electronic marketplaces for consumers (e.g. ebay) and the use of e-commerce in trade between companies will be discussed in the context of intermediation and auction theory. From a legal perspective, in addition to the intellectual property regulations relevant to information goods (copyright, software patents), the legal issues of electronic commerce under contract law and competition law as well as the particular legal problems of cross-border electronic commerce and domain law are dealt with. 

Learning objectives

Students acquire knowledge of national and international legal norms on the law of electronic commerce and on the economics of information assets and electronic markets in legal terms. The direct linking of legal and economic aspects illustrates the complex interaction of institutional framework conditions and economic incentives. In the context of the in-depth study "Management of Market-Oriented Value Chains", the module serves to specialize in one aspect of the management of market-oriented value chains. Its aim is to open up the possibility of increased profiling and to acquire in-depth content-related skills in individual aspects of the management of market-oriented value chains. In the context of the specialization "Economics and Law of the Global Economy", this module, in combination with the compulsory modules and the two other optional modules, enables students to gain an integrated overall understanding of the global economy.  

Proof of performance:

Written examination of 60 minutes or grade certification. If the proof of performance is provided in the form of a grade certification, this will be announced at the latest at the beginning of the event, together with the specific modalities for obtaining the grade certificate.

Bibliography:

  • Boyacigiller/Phillips/Kleinberg/Sackmann, Conceptualizing Culture. Elucidating the Streams of Research in International Cross-Cultural Management. In: Punnett/Shenkar (Hrsg.): Handbook for International Management Research. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2. Überarbeitete Aufl. 2004: 99-167. 
  • Harris/Moran, Managing Cultural Differences, 6. Aufl., Elsevier, 2004. 
  • Primecz/Romani/ Sackmann (Hrsg.) Cross-Cultural Management in Practice: Culture and Negotiated Meanings, Edward Elgar, 2011. 

Business Analytics

Lecturer:

Prof. Dr. Claudius Steinhardt
Workload:

180 hours; Contact hours: 36h; Self-study: 144 hours
Content

  • Introduction to Business Analytics
  • Data Preprocessing & Exploratory Analytics
  • Methods of Classification
  • Clustering & Association Rules

Learning outcomes

  • Students will have a broad overview of the different aspects of the field and be theoretically competent in dealing with the challenges of business analytics 
  • Students will have basic theoretical knowledge of different particular methods of data mining for business analytics, being able to analyze their potential and their individual strengths/weaknesses depending on the given task 
  • Based on the theory, students will be enabled to systematically and adequately apply state-of-the-art software to solve business analytics tasks 

Proof of performance:

Written examination 

Bibliography

  • Larose, D., Larose, C.: "Discovering Knowledge in Data: An Introduction to Data Mining", Wiley (current edition).
  • Larose, D., Larose, C.: "Data Mining And Predictive Analytics", Wiley (current edition).
  • Shmueli, G., Bruce, P., Patel, N.: "Data Mining for Business Analytics: Concepts, Techniques, and Applications in XLMiner", Wiley (current edition). 

Applied Public Management

Lecturer:

Prof. Dr. Julia Thaler 

Workload:

180 hours; Contact hours: 24h; Self-study: 156 hours 

Recommended prerequisites:

The module requires basic knowledge of public management issues, as typically acquired in any bachelor's program in economics.

Content:

In this module, selected current challenges of public management are analyzed on the basis of practical case studies (e.g. Cases from Harvard Business School Publishing) or current practical projects and thus, theoretical knowledge is applied to concrete questions. Implications for management are derived.

Learning objectives:

After completing the module, students should be able to critically discuss the particularities of public management and transfer theoretical knowledge to concrete practical questions. They should be able to derive implications for coping with current challenges.

Proof of performance:

Written examination of 60 minutes or grade certification. If the proof of performance is provided in the form of a grade certification, this will be announced at the latest at the beginning of the module, together with the specific modalities for obtaining the grade certificate.

Bibliography:

  • Bovaird, T. & Loeffler, E. (2016), Public Management and Governance. London and New York: Routledge
  • Ferlie, E., Lynn, L., & Pollitt, C. (2007), The Oxford Handbook of Public Management. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
  • Current research articles from leading public management journals (Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Public Management Review, Public Administration Review) 

Contact details

Office 36/1242 Office 36/1242

Legende

  • 1: Office 36/1242